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Tulane Global Health Digest - October 2011

Posted by Alex on October 8, 2011 at 10:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Tulane Global Health Digest – October 2011

http://globalhealthreadinggroup.webs.com/


1.   Next GHIG Dinner: October 2011

      Which dates work for you?  http://www.doodle.com/psu8dag9mutpsrne

2.   The creation of an International Health Service Corps

      PERSPECTIVE: An International Service Corps for Health — An Unconventional Prescription for Diplomacy.  Kerry, Auld, Farmer. NEJM 2010.

3.   USAID: New Course on Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancy (HTSP)

4.  Stanford-NBC News Fellowship in Global Health Media

5.   Responses to Complex Emergencies: An International Perspective featuring   Dr. Manuel Carballo, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, 7PM - 9PM

6.   Upcoming Global Health Education Consortium Conference   

      http://2011globalhealth.org/  November 13–15, 2011

7.  International Emergency Health Fellowship

8.  WHO Bulletin October 2011 issue:

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1.        Pick a date for the next GHIG Dinner:  October 2011

Join us for an evening of dinner and discussion.  We host a bimonthly potluck where residents and faculty can share their experiences in global health.

Please let us know which dates work best for you: 

http://www.doodle.com/psu8dag9mutpsrne

Speakers: TBA

Location: Christina and Alex’s: 718 St. Roch Ave, NOLA

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2. International Health Service Corps

The Fogarty Center, CDC and PEPFAR in Washington DC are piloting a medical arm of the Peace Corps called the Global Health Partnership.  This is scheduled to be piloted in August 2011, with 20 people for one year each and a goal of growing to 700 corps members over the next five years. Plans including provision of debt amnesty for corps members and finances for this part of the program are still being investigated, but it looks promising.

Perspective from The New England Journal of Medicine — An International Service Corps for Health — An Unconventional Prescription for Diplomacy. Vanessa Bradford Kerry, M.D., Sara Auld, M.D., and Paul Farmer, M.D., Ph.D. N Engl J Med 2010; 363:1199-1201. 

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1006501

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3.        USAID: New Course on Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancy (HTSP)

USAID's Global Health eLearning Center (www.globalhealthlearning.org) is pleased to announce the release of a new eLearning course on the Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancy (HTSP). Some researchers have concluded that 1.8 million under-five deaths could be averted if all pregnancis were spaced 36 months from the preceding birth.
Do you know the magnitude of health problems related to timing and spacing of pregnancies in the developing world?
Do you want to know how to add a HTSP approach to your own program?
Take this course to find the answers to these questions and to learn much more about how you can implement HTSP strategies into your own programs.

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4. Stanford-NBC News Fellowship in Global Health Media 

http://globalhealth.stanford.edu/strategicinitiatives/gh_media_fellowship.html

Stanford University’s Center for Innovation in Global Health has launched the first U.S. Fellowship in Media and Global Health to demonstrate how multiple media platforms can have significant impact upon work in global health.  Fellows who will be competitively chosen from a national pool of medical students committed to a career in global health will learn how multiple media modalities can play a significant role in health and human rights efforts, foundation and government health assistance, and individual health choices.

This opportunity is targeted to provide medical students, residents and/or faculty with 12-months of practical training in global health reporting using a variety of media platforms including: print, photography, television, social networking and fundamentals in journalism and communications.

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5. Responses to Complex Emergencies: An International Perspective featuring Dr. Manuel Carballo

Date: Thursday, October 20, 2011
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Building: Lavin-Bernick Center (LBC) in Room 202
Location: uptown campus
Other Information: Rechler Conference Room

The Tulane School of Social Work is proud to present a free community event on Thursday, Oct. 20 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Rechler Conference Room (Rm. 202) on the second floor of the Lavin-Bernick Center. Dr. Manuel Carballo will present about “Responses to Complex Emergencies: An International Perspective” followed by a Q&A session with audience members.

Dr. Carballo, Executive Director of the International Centre for Migration, Health, and Development (ICMHD) in Switzerland, will discuss best practices and challenges in responding to complex emergencies and address the implications for migrant and refugee populations.
Along with providing information on the related initiatives of ICMHD, Dr. Carballo will share insight from his experiences in post-disaster and post-conflict situations around the world.

About the Presenter

Dr. Manuel Carballo is the Executive Director of the International Centre for Migration, Health, and Development which is based in Switzerland. The Center works with governments, UN agencies, NGOs and other organizations interested in improving the health and welfare of people affected by migration, economically or politically. The Center also organizes training courses for humanitarian relief workers, UN personnel, health practitioners, public health professionals, policy makers/planners and military and peacekeeping forces. Dr. Carballo is an epidemiologist who has previously worked in multiple countries for the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations. He served as the WHO Public Health Advisor for Bosnia and Herzegovina and was also Chief of Social and Behavioral Research for WHO’s Global Programme on AIDS. With the United Nations, he has been responsible for health assessments for refugee populations and for emergency responses for countries recovering from post-disaster or post-conflict situations. As a founding member of the UNAIDS Uniformed Services Task Force, he has worked extensively on HIV prevention programs with uniformed services and peacekeeping forces. His areas of specialty include migrant and refugee health, reproductive health, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS. He is also a Professor of Clinical Public Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York.

Sponsored by: School of Social Work

Admission: Free
Attendance: Open to the public
Open to: Alumni, Faculty, Graduate students, Parents, Prospective undergrads, Staff, Undergraduates, Visitors

For more information contact Elaine Wright via email to ewright3@tulane.edu or by phone at 504-862-3472

Additional information may be found at the event website at http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=8vppaidab&oeidk=a07e505hm2afa5399d7

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6. Upcoming Global Health Conference

http://2011globalhealth.org/

The Consortium of Universities for Global Health, the Canadian Society for International Health and the Global Health Education Consortium

November 13–15, 2011

Montreal, Canada

Featured Speakers:


Eric Goosby

Global AIDS Coordinator, PEPFAR

Roger Glass

Director, Fogarty International Center; Associate Director for Global Health

Research, National Institutes of Health

Harold Varmus

Director of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

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7. International Emergency Health Fellowship

http://www.uic.edu/com/er/EMProg/intlfellowship.shtml


International Emergency Medicine and
Health Fellowship

The University of Illinois is one of the first institutions who introduced a fellowship in International Emergency Medicine with the aim to provide training for expertise in management of international emergency medicine and health related issues.

The field itself developed out of a desire to extend available resources in leadership and experience to locations and situations that lacked the infrastructure or organization to address emergent health conditions. The role of international emergency medicine and international health as a specialty continues to expand, as the world evolves into a more global society.

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8.  WHO Bulletin October 2011 issue

Volume 89, Number 10, October 2011, 701-776

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

In this month’s Bulletin
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.001011


EDITORIALS

Global action on social determinants of health
- Michael Marmot
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.094862

Social determinants of health: practical solutions to deal with a well-recognized issue
- Rüdiger Krech
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.094870

 NEWS

Public health round-up

Behind the “Glasgow effect”

Tackling social factors to save lives in India

A decade towards better health in Chile

Dealing with the big picture in Australia

Brazil calls for pact on social factors to improve health

 RESEARCH

Global mesothelioma deaths reported to the World Health Organization between 1994 and 2008
- Vanya Delgermaa et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.086678

Excess child mortality after discharge from hospital in Kilifi, Kenya: a retrospective cohort analysis
- Jennifer C Moïsi et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.089235

Childhood and adult mortality from unintentional falls in India
- Jagnoor Jagnoor et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.086306

Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among children in Greenland
- Bolette Søborg et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.084152

Preoperative visual acuity among cataract surgery patients and countries’ state of development: a global study
- Shaheen P Shah et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.080366

Health-care-associated infection in Africa: a systematic review
- Sepideh Bagheri Nejad et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.088179

Estimated global incidence of Japanese encephalitis: a systematic review
- Grant L Campbell et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.085233

PERSPECTIVES

Action on social determinants of health is essential to tackle noncommunicable diseases
- Kumanan Rasanathan & Rüdiger Krech
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.094243

 

 

Tulane Global Health Digest - May 2011

Posted by Alex on May 21, 2011 at 12:54 AM Comments comments (0)

Tulane Global Health Digest – May 2011

1.   Next GHIG Dinner:  Tuesday May 24th, 2011, 6:30pm
      Speakers:

  • Nick Van Sickles, Infectious Disease fellow, on his cholera work in Haiti and 
  • Tayo Idera-Abdullah, Peds resident, about her recent rotation in Jamaica.


2.  Perspective: Responding to Cholera in Post-Earthquake Haiti.  NEJM. Jan 2011.

3. AAP Section on International Child Health Spring Newsletter

    http://www.aap.org/sections/ich/Newsletter_Spring_%202010_LR.pdf

4.  Series on Tropical Medicine Certificate Courses:  Johns Hopkins

5. May  issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

 

 

1.       Next GHIG Dinner:  Tuesday May 24th, 2011, 6:30pm

Where:

Hosted by Dr. Olteanu.

Speakers:

Nick Van Sickles, Infectious Disease fellow, on his cholera work in Haiti and 
Tayo Idera-Abdullah, Peds resident, about her recent rotation in Jamaica.

                RSVP: To Alex at astancul at tulane.edu.

                   

2.       Article: Perspective: Responding to Cholera in Post-Earthquake Haiti. NEJM. Jan 2011.

 

In keeping with Dr. Van Sickles work, here is a quick run down from January’s NEJM.

http://www.nejm.org.libproxy.tulane.edu:2048/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1012997

 

 

3. AAP Section on International Child Health Spring Newsletter

     http://www.aap.org/sections/ich/Newsletter_Spring_%202010_LR.pdf



4.      Series: Tropical Medicine Certificate Courses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

http://www.jhsph.edu/academics/programs/certificates/program/13

Educational Objectives

This eight-week summer program is designed to provide training in tropical medicine and related public health issues through a multidisciplinary approach. It is also designed to prepare participants for working with current and emerging health problems in developing countries and health problems of travelers. This program focuses broadly on issues of tropical health and on clinical tropical medicine. Toward the program’s conclusion, students will have acquired a strong scientific basis for preventing, diagnosis, treating, and controlling tropical health problems. The curriculum will consist of:

· Specific tropical diseases and detailed case studies stressing diagnosis, treatment, and the implementation of preventive control measures; · Recent advances in diagnostic methodologies; · Human behavior associated with the transmission of infection and of local perceptions of the disease; · Laboratory sessions focusing on diagnostic methods for identification of blood, intestinal, and tissue parasites as well as their vectors. Sessions include practical lab experience in parasitology and diagnosis;

Intended Audience

Johns Hopkins Medical Institution students and staff; health professionals; other individuals with an interest in tropical medicine.

Admissions Criteria

Graduate degree in a health or science; or bachelors degree with significant experience in a health profession.

Course of Study

8 week institute offered in Summer. Institute is offered in 4 two-week long modules that may be completed over a period of several years...

Requirements for Successful Completion

Four courses:

·         223.684 Vector Borne Diseases in the Tropics

·         223.685 HIV, TB and other Chronic Infections

·         223.686 Child and Public Health in the Tropics

·         223.688 Intestinal Infections in the Tropics

 

 

5.     May  issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

Highlights from the May 2011 issue:

 

·         People with diabetes face higher risk of tuberculosis infection

·         Psychiatrist Mustafa Elmasri challenges the way the international community handles mental health care in crises

·         Opt-out HIV testing dramatically increases cases diagnosed in Zambia

·         A case for no-fault compensation for vaccine injuries

·         Abortifacients: clinical versus home use

·         One third of patients in Thailand are “medical tourists”: effects on the health system

·         Road crashes double over four years in Kyrgyzstan

Volume 89, Number 5, May 2011, 241-316

 

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

In this month’s Bulletin
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.000511

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 368kb

 

EDITORIALS

Influenza in the 21st century: a call for papers
- Tim Nguyen et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.088476

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 453kb

 

The costs of performance-based financing
- Andreas Kalk
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.087247

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 445kb

 

NEWS

Public health round-up

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 912kb

 

Volunteers vital for counting births and deaths in Ghana

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 956kb 

 

Vaccination: rattling the supply chain

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 945kb

 

Mental health beyond the crises

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 538kb

 

RESEARCH

Opt-out provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling in primary care outpatient clinics in Zambia
- Stephanie M Topp et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.084442

·  Abstract [HTML]

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 914kb

 

The effects of medical tourism: Thailand’s experience
- Anchana NaRanong & Viroj NaRanong
doi: 10.2471/BLT.09.072249

·  Abstract [HTML]

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 826kb

 

Trends in traffic collisions and injuries in Kyrgyzstan, 2003–2007
- Viola Artikova et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.084434

·  Abstract [HTML]

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 731kb

 

Cross-sectional assessment reveals high diabetes prevalence among newly-diagnosed tuberculosis cases
- Blanca I Restrepo et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.085738

Tulane Global Health Digest - March 2011

Posted by Alex on March 15, 2011 at 11:53 PM Comments comments (0)

Tulane Global Health Digest – March 2011


 

1.      Last Chance: CHOOSE a date for this month’s dinner! http://doodle.com/vdhm2zf83fspd77x

2.      Radiation Emergency Medical Management

3.      Join Jeff Percak at PHR's next Asylum Program Training! 

4.      Human resources for Health Portal 

5.      MSF info session April 6th

6.      TB transmitted from elephant

7.      March WHO bulletin 

 

 

1.      CHOOSE a date.  http://doodle.com/vdhm2zf83fspd77x

 

 

2.      Radiation Emergency Medical Management.

 


 

http://www.remm.nlm.gov/

 

Attached:

Radiation Injury After a Nuclear Detonation: Medical Consequences and the Need for Scarce Resources Allocation. Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2011;5:S32-S4.

http://www.dmphp.org/cgi/reprint/5/Supplement_1/S32

 

 

 

3.      Join Jeff Percak at PHR's next Asylum Program Training! 

Alex, can you forward this to the GHIG and see if anyone else is interested in going? I'd be up for it if I can find 1 or 2 people to carpool with and maybe share a hotel for the Friday night before...

jeff

-----Original Message----- 
From: Christy Fujio, PHR [mailto:web@phrusa.org
Sent: Wed 3/2/2011 12:25 PM 
Subject: REMINDER: Register Now for PHR's next Asylum Program Training! 
  
Aiding Immigrant Survivors of Torture and other Human Rights Abuses: 
Physical and Psychological Documentation of Trauma

Co-sponsored by Baylor College of Medicine

Saturday, April 9, 2011 9am-5pm

Institute for Spirituality and Health 
8100 Greenbriar, #220 
Houston, TX 77054

The American Academy of Family Practice (AAFP) has approved this training for 6.5 
CME credits.

Register today! 

Seasoned forensic evaluation experts Coleen Kivlahan, MD, MSPH and Joanne Ahola, MD will provide health professionals with the skills necessary to perform physical and psychological evaluations for survivors of human rights abuses. Asylum Program Director and immigration attorney Christy Fujio, JD, MA will de-mystify the asylum process and explain the critical role that health professionals play in aiding immigrant survivors of torture and other abuse as they seek humanitarian protection in the US.

Physicians for Human Rights' Asylum Network consists of over 400 health professionals throughout the country who offer pro bono psychological and physical evaluations to document evidence of torture and other human rights abuses for men, women and children fleeing persecution in their home countries. These evaluations are used in support of immigration applications so that survivors can start new lives in the US.

Qualified health professionals are invited to attend the training and join our network of volunteers across the country. Meet other health professionals dedicated to assisting survivors and learn how you, too, can join the effort!

http://phr.convio.net/site/R?i=RLHSQJao5GofxzjQoO46Eg..

Session highlights: 
 -- Human rights, asylum law, and the role of health professionals in the immigration process; 
 -- Detention of immigrants; 
 -- Evaluating and documenting the physical and psychological sequelae of torture and other human rights abuses, including domestic violence;

 -- Effective affidavit writing and providing oral testimony in Immigration Court; and 
 -- Working effectively with volunteer attorneys to help indigent immigrants.

Tuition for this unique, all-day seminar is $85 and includes lunch, coffee breaks, afternoon refreshments, and training materials. CME certificates will be provided at the end of the training day.

Registration will close when we have reached capacity for the event, so be sure to sign up now!  http://phr.convio.net/site/R?i=YUmCHhU9sEbJH23fHKHfjg..

 

 

4.      Human resources for Health Portal 

I am giving a lecture on the supply of health services this evening in my Health Economics class. It was therefore fitting to receive an email this morning notifying me of the launch of a new website from the World Bank where they have centralized information and resources related to health human resources. You can find this website at www.worldbank.org/hrh.

According to the World Health Report 2006, there are approximately 60 million health workers globally, but despite this there are important shortages and imbalances in the workforce everywhere. As I will try to argue in class today, without human resources there would be no health services, yet it is sometimes easy to forget that health systems are made up of people. Health care is a service industry but despite this human resources are frequently neglected by planners and researchers. It is therefore great to see another site where information on this topic is centralized and made available for others to learn

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KarenGrepin/~3/bA600FwkRaU/new-human-resource-for-health-portal-is-launched.html

 

 

5.      MSF info session April 6th


PUT YOUR IDEALS INTO PRACTICE: 
DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS RECRUITMENT INFORMATION SESSION - NEW ORLEANS

Wednesday, April 6, 2011 - 7:00PM (CT)
Audubon Zoo - Dominion Learning Center Auditorium
6500 Magazine St
New Orleans, LA 70118

Every day, Doctors Without Borders aid workers from around the world provide assistance to people whose survival is threatened by violence, neglect, or catastrophe – treating those most in need regardless of political, religious, or economic interest. Whether an emergency involves armed conflicts or epidemics, malnutrition or natural disasters, Doctors Without Borders is committed to bringing quality medical care to people caught in crisis.

On April 6 in New Orleans, medical and non-medical professionals are invited to join us for a presentation to learn more about how you can join Doctors Without Borders' pool of dedicated aid workers. You'll meet experienced Doctors Without Borders aid workers from the New Orleans area and hear firsthand stories of "life in the field." Aid worker and recruiter Rogier van Helmond will discuss requirements and the application process.

For more information and to register please visit: http://msfneworleansinfosession040611.eventbrite.com/ 

________________________________ 

Jennifer Lessard
Public Events Associate
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)
333 Seventh Avenue, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10001
www.doctorswithoutborders.org

 

 

 

6.      TB transmitted from elephant

EID Journal Home > Volume 17, Number 3–March 2011

Volume 17, Number 3–March 2011

Research

Elephant-to-Human Transmission of Tuberculosis, 2009

Rendi Murphree, Comments to Author Jon V. Warkentin, John R. Dunn, William Schaffner, and Timothy F. Jones
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (R. Murphree); Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, Tennessee, USA (R. Murphree, J.V. Warkentin, J.R. Dunn, T.F. Jones); and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville (W. Schaffner, T.F. Jones)

Suggested citation for this article

Abstract
In 2009, the Tennessee Department of Health received reports of 5 tuberculin skin test (TST) conversions among employees of an elephant refuge and isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a resident elephant. To determine the extent of the outbreak and identify risk factors for TST conversion, we conducted a cohort study and onsite assessment. Risk for conversion was increased for elephant caregivers and administrative employees working in the barn housing the M. tuberculosis–infected elephant or in offices connected to the barn (risk ratio 20.3, 95% confidence interval 2.8–146.7). Indirect exposure to aerosolized M. tuberculosis and delayed or inadequate infection control practices likely contributed to transmission. The following factors are needed to reduce risk for M. tuberculosis transmission in the captive elephant industry: increased knowledge about M. tuberculosis infection in elephants, improved infection control practices, and specific occupational health programs.

 

 

7.       March WHO bulletin

 

Highlights from the March 2011 issue:

·         Rising status of women, increased risk of smoking

·         Looming dementia epidemic in Asia

·         Antimicrobial resistance: what governments can do

·         Health challenges after floods in Pakistan

·         Coordinating HIV/AIDS programmes in China

·         Shortage of mental health workers worldwide

 

Now you can follow the Bulletin on Twitter: http://twitter.com/WHOBulletin

And join our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/BulletinoftheWorldHealthOrganization

 Complete list of contents for Volume 89, Number 3, March 2011,

 Abstracts and other items are available in عربي中文Français,Русский and Español.

 Volume 89, Number 3, March 2011, 161-240

 

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

In this month’s Bulletin
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.000311

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 383kb

 

EDITORIALS

Women and the smoking epidemic: turning the tide
- Vikram S Pathania
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.086389

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 525kb

 

Compassionate use of medicinal products in Europe: current status and perspectives
- Mussa Rahbari & Nuh N Rahbari
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.085712

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 524kb

 

NEWS

Public health round-up

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 614kb

 

Looming dementia epidemic in Asia

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 648kb

 

Mobilizing political will to contain antimicrobial resistance

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 955kb

 

Tackling tuberculosis with an all-inclusive approach

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 667kb

 

RESEARCH

Management of diabetes and associated cardiovascular risk factors in seven countries: a comparison of data from national health examination surveys
- Emmanuela Gakidou et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.080820

·  Abstract [HTML]

·  Full article text [HTML]

· 

Tulane Global Health Digest - February 2011

Posted by Alex on February 24, 2011 at 11:53 PM Comments comments (0)



1.        March Dinner club Poll: Let us know when you can make it

               http://doodle.com/vdhm2zf83fspd77x

2.       Join the Global Health Corps

3.       International Rotation with Doctors for Global Health

4.       International Rotation for 3rd year peds residents in Jamaica – the word from Tayo.

5.       AAPeds International Elective Award

6.       ASTMH Travel Award

7.       Harvard Certificate Program in Refugee Trauma

8.       February issue of the WHO Bulletin

·         What is the ideal weight gain during pregnancy? A study from Viet Nam
·         Modern contraceptive use in Africa stagnates
·         Radio programme helps combat food insecurity
·         Why so slow to develop new antibiotics?
·         Diabetes – a product of modern technology
·        Many people miss out on diagnosis and treatment of high blood cholesterol 

 

 

 

1.       March Dinner club Poll: Let us know when you can make it

 

Click on the following link to let us know your availability. We will pick a date that works for the most people.

 

http://doodle.com/vdhm2zf83fspd77x

 

Location and speakers to be determined.

 

 

2.       Join the Global Health Corps

 

Last chance to apply for the Global Health Corp program, see more details below.


We really appreciate your support as we enter our final push to find exceptional emerging leaders to serve as the 2011-2012 Global Health Corps fellows! Please forward the flyer below widely.

Click to view this email in a browser 

 

 

 

3.       International Rotation with Doctors for Global Health

http://www.dghonline.org/get-involved/volunteer

DGH works with marginalized communities around the world to promote health and human rights with those who have difficulty making their voices heard. Part of that work involves the recruitment of qualified volunteers who are compatible with DGH's mission and that of our partner organizations. Please keep in mind that we have a limited number of positions available for volunteering abroad. If there is not a position available for you abroad at present, there are other ways in which you can work with DGH in the United States. DGH affirms the philosophy of "think globally, act locally" and encourages all volunteers to promote our mission locally as well as nationally and internationally.  

 

 

4.       International Rotation for 3rd year peds residents in Jamaica – the word from Tayo.

 

http://issatrustfoundation.com/blog.htm 

 

This is a great opportunity for those looking for a international rotation... we are sponsored by the foundation in conjunction with the ministry of health of Jamaica... A driver takes us to sites in the am and brings us back in the PM... seeing lots of cool cases and then a lot of the run of the mill URI as well.. Anywho.. pass it on... Diane is looking for third year peds residents.. to fill 2 spots a month... all they need is to pay for airfare.. hotel is awesome ( free food and drinks and activities)....

 

see ya soon

 

TAYO

 

 

 

 

5.       AAP International Elective Award

 

International Elective Award

Each academic year the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) will have a minimum of twelve, five-hundred dollar ($500.00) awards to be given in two cycles (number awarded per cycle will be at the discretion of the review committee) to categorical or combined-training pediatric residents who wish to complete a clinical pediatric elective in the developing world during residency. Fellowship Trainee members are also eligible to apply, however only one Fellowship Trainee applicant will be awarded per cycle. Awards are given solely on the basis of the application and an accompanying letter from the applicant's program director, faculty mentor, or global health director. The selection committee is composed of members from the AAP Section on International Child Health (SOICH) and the AAP Section on Medical Students, Residents and Fellowship Trainees.

 

Applicants must be a member of SOICH in order to apply for this award and can submit their secure application through the following link: https://www.formrouter.net/forms01@AAPED/SOICHResident.html

 

The International Elective Awards will be given within two cycles, due September 15 and March 15.The online application will be available year round at the following link:

 

http://www.aap.org/sections/ypn/r/funding_awards/intertravelgrant-form.html

 

 

6.       ASTMH Travel Award

http://www.astmh.org/Awards.htm

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Travel Award
Application submission deadline:  April 6, 2011
Download the application guidelines.
Limited funding is available to support annual meeting travel of selected students, young investigators and scientists actively working in the tropical medicine field. Travel award applicants participate in the meeting through oral or poster presentations and are evaluated based on abstract quality and research results. Applicants need not be ASTMH members. 
Submit your application here beginning March 2.

 

 

7.       Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

http://hprt-cambridge.org/

The Global Mental Health Trauma and Recovery Certificate Training Program is an innovative training program offering a state-of-the-art cultural and scientific learning experience addressing the needs of traumatized persons and communities worldwide. Experts advance their practice and leadership skills in a new global community of practice. The course offers a blended learning experience with 2 weeks onsite in Italy followed by 6 months on the internet. The program is lead by internationally acclaimed faculty. Initiated in November 2005, 260 alumni are working in over 70 countries and are creating a new alumni association. Certificates of completion are awarded by the Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Italy, HPRT and the Harvard Division of Continuing Medical Education.

 

 

8.       February issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

Highlights from the February 2011 issue:

 

·  What is the ideal weight gain during pregnancy? A study from Viet Nam

·  Modern contraceptive use in Africa stagnates

·  Radio programme helps combat food insecurity

·  Why so slow to develop new antibiotics?

·  Diabetes – a product of modern technology

·  Many people miss out on diagnosis and treatment of high blood cholesterol 

 

Now you can follow the Bulletin on Twitter: http://twitter.com/WHOBulletin

And join our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/BulletinoftheWorldHealthOrganization

 

Complete list of contents for Volume 89, Number 2, February 2011

 

Abstracts and other items are available in عربي中文FrançaisРусский andEspañol.

 

Volume 89, Number 2, February 2011, 81-160

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

In this month’s Bulletin
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.000211

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text
pdf, 371kb

·   

EDITORIALS

 

The potential of internet-based technologies for sharing data of public health importance
- Greg Fegan et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.085910

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text
pdf, 526kb

·   

Scaling up changes in doctors’ education for rural retention: a comment on World HealthOrganization recommendations
- Nir Eyal & Samia A Hurst
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.085571

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text
pdf, 489kb

·   

NEWS

 

Public health round-up

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text
pdf, 932kb

·   

Tuning in to secure food

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text
pdf, 1.00Mb

Tulane Global Health Digest - January 2011

Posted by Alex on January 10, 2011 at 11:50 PM Comments comments (0)

 

1.      Next GHIG Dinner:  January 27th, 2011, 6:00pm

Theme:  Haiti

Speakers: Alison Smith MD/PhD and Gabriel Thelus, Hatian village leader

2.       Perspective: Public Health in Haiti — Challenges and Progress. NEJM.

3.       Ted Talk: Ernest Madu on world-class healthcare

4.       Perspective: Courting Danger while Doing Good — Protecting Global Health Workers from Harm. NEJM.

5.       AAP Section on International Child Health Newsletter

6.       January issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

 

1.       Next GHIG Dinner:  January 27th, 2011, 6:00pm.

Where:

Hosted by Dr. Olteanu.

It is a tall, red-brick condo building. Parking on Upperline or Lyons St. The  entrance is on Coliseum. Ring the bell at 201.

Theme:  Haiti

Speakers:

 Alison Smith MD/PhD student, will talk about the medical trips she has organized to Haiti.

Gabriel Thelus, the leader of the community with whom Alison has been working.  He will be talking about Haiti's healthcare challenges and about his vision of the school-based clinic that Tulane will be supporting with their recent I-CATCH grant.

                Lagniappe: Dinner provided from Naked Pizza courtesy of the Department of Pediatrics.

                RSVP: To Alex at astancul at tulane.edu so we know how much food to order.

                   

 

2.       Article: Public Health in Haiti — Challenges and Progress.

 

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1100118

Dowell SF, Tappero JW, Frieden TR. Public Health in Haiti — Challenges and Progress.  N Engl J Med. 2011 Jan 10.

 

 

3.       Ted Talk: Ernest Madu on world-class healthcare

 

Dr. Ernest Madu runs the Heart Institute of the Caribbean in Kingston, Jamaica, where he proves that -- with careful design, smart technical choices, and a true desire to serve -- it's possible to offer world-class healthcare in the developing world.

 

4.       Courting Danger while Doing Good — Protecting Global Health Workers from Harm

 

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1011407

Claire Panosian, M.D. Courting Danger while Doing Good — Protecting Global Health Workers from Harm. N Engl J Med 2010; 363:2484-2485 December 23, 2010

 

 

5.       AAP Section on International Child Health Newsletter

 

From: Alejandra Lule [mailto:ALule@aap.org]

Sent: Wed 1/5/2011 1:44 PM

Subject: Section on International Child Health Newsletter

 

The December 2010 Newsletter is available for all to see. Please visit the following link

http://www.aap.org/sections/ich/ICHnewsletterDec2010.pdf

 

Happy New Year to all!

 

 

6.       January issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

From: Bulletin Announce on behalf of bulletin
Sent:
 Tue 1/4/2011 4:02 AM
To:
 BULLETINANNOUNCE@LISTSERV.WHO.INT
Subject:
 Email alert: January issue of the WHO Bulletin

 

Dear reader,

 

Highlights from the January 2011 issue:

 

·  Campaigns against acid violence in Bangladesh spur change

·  Twice as many road deaths in China found in death registration data than in police records

·  Have advertising campaigns worked to reduce antibiotics use in France?

·  Call for an end to free formula milk for newborns in South Africa

·  Cross-border medical travel challenges conventional public health thinking

·  Dr Robert D Newman, WHO’s Global Malaria Programme, says in an interview thatmalaria eradication will take 40 years or more to achieve.

 

Complete list of contents for Volume 89, Number 1, January 2011

 

Abstracts and other items are available in عربي, 中文, Français, Русский and Español.

 

Volume 89, Number 1, January 2011, 1-80

 

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

In this month’s Bulletin
doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.000111

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 372kb

 

EDITORIALS

Violence against women: an urgent public health priority
- Claudia Garcia-Moreno & Charlotte Watts
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.085217

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 515kb

 

Systematic reviews in the Bulletin
- Maria Luisa Clark & Shyam Thapa
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.084970

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 478kb

 

NEWS

Public health round-up

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 911kb

 

Campaigns against acid violence spur change

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 917kb

 

Are antibiotics still “automatic” in France?

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 914kb

 

Learning to outwit malaria

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 589kb

 

RESEARCH

Maternal mortality estimation at the subnational level: a model-based method with an application to Bangladesh
- Saifuddin Ahmed & Kenneth Hill
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.076851

·  Abstract [HTML]

·  Full article text [HTML]

·  Full article text pdf, 2.23Mb

 

Progress towards Millennium Development Goal 1 in Latin America and the Caribbean: the importance of the choice of indicator for undernutrition
- Chessa K Lutter et al.
doi: 10.2471/BLT.10.078618


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